My birth trauma experience ~ written for Maternal Mental Health week ~ 1st – 7th May 2017. 

My birth trauma experience 


My eldest daughter was born in the spring of 2012, I had a fairly normal pregnancy and was still able to work full time with children, the job that I’d done for 8 years. We were excited as first time parents, and moved into a new family house complete with a nursery and a whole heap of equipment, toys and clothes ready for the babies’ arrival. I had prepared myself for a natural birth, being a naturally anxious person for the whole of my life, I found the technique of ‘Hypnobirthing’ very beneficial by reading the books and listening to the CDs. 

At 4am my water’s broke, I was calm and collected and I took everything in my stride. But then there was a problem, panic set in after building myself up to stay calm, I called my local hospital’s maternity triage department and I was told to “come straight here.” When arriving at the hospital there wasn’t too much of a panic and my labour was induced. This was a slow process and I was monitored very closely as the midwives were concerned about the baby’s heart rate, I was told that she had “Meconium in her waters.” After several pain killing methods I started to feel like this experience wasn’t happening to me, it was like I was on the celling, looking down on someone who was going through it all. I remember a yellow piece of paper and the words: “We need to deliver this baby right now,” then all I remember is the lights of the corridor as I was transported into surgery. My baby’s heart rate had reached a dangerously low level.  

I don’t remember a lot else at this point, except trying not to cry with the relief that she was here safely, and the relief that I felt once she let out that all important first cry! I struggled to contain my laughter when the surgeon urged me not to cry as he was completing the stiches after the C-Section, and as he said “Whoa Mamma” it made me chuckle and I moved more! I tried to contain a mixture of happy tears and laughter due to the situation. After the drama died down I was left looking very swollen from all of the painkillers and various drugs from the operation, I found the nights horrendous as I was in so much pain and the ward was very noisy at night, as I was used to sleeping in silence at home! I remember getting very upset and uncontrollably crying on the second night as I’d asked for assistance to help change my baby’s nappy and help didn’t surface for hours, once someone did arrive I got it in the neck and was ‘told off’ because the nappy had been left too long! All I could do was to protest was that I had been asking for help for a number of hours but nobody came, needless to say I was extremely relieved the next day when I was allowed to take her home to the comfort of our own house. I found that she would settle to sleep better if she was swaddled tightly in a blanket. 

Just 2 week’s under 3 years since the birth of my first child, my second daughter was born. I did have it always in my mind regarding the trauma of my first birth, I had a lot of motoring and scans the second time around as I had a anterior and low lying placenta. When I was given the option of trying for a natural birth with a low-lying placenta I thought back again to the trauma from the first time, I decided that I simply couldn’t go through another emergency caesarean if it got to that point and re-live the experience again and therefore I opted for a planned caesarean the 2nd time around. Which was a very straightforward and very well planned procedure and I found that my recovery time was better the second time around as I did know what to expect in terms of the length of recovery time and what I could and couldn’t do.  


Thanks for reading 🙂 

www.birthtraumatrust.org

The Birth Trauma Trust aims to raise awareness of birth trauma, its link to perinatal wellbeing and mental health and how women are cared for, they also have a Facebook page: 

https://www.facebook.com/birthtraumatrust/

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