Why can’t I just feel settled?

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So the best way for me to get my frustrations and anger out as usual is to write it all in a blog post! I’m sure I’ve been very annoying lately on my personal Facebook profile as I’m continually ranting about our current housing situation! This is because I feel so wronged and I’m trying to ensure that I do the very best for my children.
Some of what I describe in this post also relates to my current assignment for my course: ‘Understanding Autism,’ as I’m learning all about the legislation that protects people who are on the Autistic Spectrum.
I want to share this experience in the hope that other people do not have to go through the same.
One of the most surprising things about me is that I just can’t settle in terms of finding appropriate housing, considering that I’m going through an assessment for Autistic Spectrum Condition and I don’t usually cope very well with too many changes, I have moved house now 17 times since the age of 18! (This does include 3 different places whilst I was at University.) I am absolutely rubbish at making decisions, I never quite know what to do for the best, and it’s even harder now I have my 2 children to think about as their safety and happiness are paramount. My own mum describes my situation as the ‘fight’ or ‘flight’ method when things start getting tricky for me to cope with.
In the most recent of house moves, I’ve moved into the nearest city to be closer to where I worked but then the house got sold so we have to find somewhere alternative, we then moved into a new build flat in a local town but this was a first floor flat with no garden so Lou really struggled to burn energy and I was struggling so much with getting 2 children and a pushchair down a flight of stairs. We then found what we thought was the perfect house in a village location, complete with village school, park and green space 5 mins walk and my parents 5 mins away via car and walking distance to the nearest town, (well it takes me 40 mins, and I’m used to this as I walk everywhere!)
We had no problems really at all for the first year of living here, until around 6 months ago the neighbouring house (that’s attached to our house) became overcrowded. A house full of adults and confrontational ones at that! People lost jobs, being in a confined space and presumably bored, they argue and swear at each other constantly. They swear, every other word, loudly in the garden, Lou is currently being assessed for Autism, if she hears new or different words or phrases, she will copy and repeat over and over. I guess I am old fashioned in my views, but I simply cannot have her going into school and repeating phrases that I didn’t hear until I started high school! They also fight, and shout in the street, a month ago a fight broke out and someone banged my door very loudly, frightened that someone would get hurt I did call the police but they seemed to be talked down as seems the case a lot of the time, sadly. As I have described before in many previous posts, my eldest daughter Lou, displays a great deal of PDA traits (Pathological Demand Avoidance) and also ADHD, her high anxiety causes her to become very frustrated and often volatile. By hearing confrontations only meters away and through our walls, this is saying to her ‘it’s ok’ to be like this, whilst myself and Lou’s daddy are doing everything in our power to keep her calm and practice relaxation techniques.
There is 0 respect and 0 consideration, these people are disrespectful to all of the families in our row of houses, they stand in their garden after 10pm at night and have very loud conversations right under the window where my 2 girls sleep, often waking them up. When you have 2 children that find it difficult to fall and stay asleep this is beyond frustrating! But my voice is a lone one, no one else seems to back me up, bar one other resident, possibly in fear of repercussions. Since we started experiencing issues with these people we’ve had 2 visitors to our house – my parents – this tells me that we are being isolated even further than we already feel, and this causes me so much stress at the moment, especially as I feel that my children can’t invite any friends to our house. Oh and I forgot to also mention the Cannabis fumes that float into our home on a daily basis so much that we cannot have our patio doors or the girls’ bedroom window open as the rooms would fill with the fumes.
Oh and one of the most difficult things for me to get my head around is that the lead tenant of the household works in a local school in an Autism base! Surely this person should realise the effects of Anti social behaviour on people on the Autistic Spectrum? You would think? I certainly would want my child going to this school! At the very least I would have thought that this person should be aware that both of my children are very wary of loud noises.
So the housing agency we rent from asked me to keep an ‘Anti-Social Behaviour’ diary, which I have done since March 2017, like I haven’t already got enough on my plate! And just in case I may be making it all up! Then cue a visit from our local housing warden, which I have to admit was the most awkward interaction that I’ve had for a very long time!
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The ‘warden’ (as I’ll refer to this person as for the purposes of this post,) proceeded to tell me that my complaint was “far too long” that I’d written about what we’ve been encountering as a family. The Warden sarcastically (I think) said that:
“By the time I’d printed off your complaint everyone else in the office had gone home.” On another day I may have found this funny, but not today when we were talking about a serious situation. So for the rest of this part of my post I will bullet point how helpful the ‘warden’ was.
(I did try and explain that I’m a blogger and writing is what I ‘do’ and that people on the ASD spectrum will often include all the details they know in fear of missing something out, that could be a vital piece of information.)
  • 60% of the conversation we had over the span of an hour was filled with jokes, everyone needs a laugh now and again, but again, for a serious matter I found it difficult to understand the warden’s jokes, and by the time my mum had explained them to me, they were far from funny! My mum (sitting in on the conversation, and glad I preempted this,) attempted to explain that “my daughter doesn’t always understand jokes.) But no – unfortunately no understanding there.
  • “I’ve had much worse” and “other people have it much worse than this.” The Warden, in an attempt to make me feel better about the situation unknowingly made it worse! By proceeding to tell me that “only last week someone tried to kill me.” And that “in other areas they have it much worse than this.” Leaving me with the feeling that I don’t really wish to stick around to allow it to get this bad! For me it is difficult to see the outer world when I’m under great stress in my little world – within my family and surroundings, it may be the case that situations are much worse in inner city areas, but we are based in a small village and I didn’t feel that my situation and feelings were taken seriously, I didn’t need to have the worry placed into my head about how worse it can get.
  • The warden referred to ‘my anxiety’ and ‘seeing things differently,’ which, yes I do, but I felt belittled in the situation that I feel very unhappy about, I don’t think any family with young children should have to put up with such anti-social behaviours, regardless of whether they have anxiety or not.
  • The warden said directly to me: “What have they done?” I referred to the 2 sides of A4, (the ASB diary,) that I’d been asked to keep, so I replied: “Here, it’s all written down.” To which the warden replied: “No, what have they done to you?” My mum had to explain that the warden meant physically, what have they done, but physically I haven’t been attacked, why should it even have to reach this point? I cannot even stand to have other people, (other than close family members,) touch me, let alone stay around long enough to let anyone physically attack me, the warden said that the only way an ASB complaint would be taken seriously was if I was physically attacked! How could the warden even put this in my head that this could happen? Making me even more fearful. So banging loudly on my door and running away and having confrontations in the street shouldn’t be taken seriously? What about intimidation? What about the mental affects? It doesn’t always need to be physical.

Now I refer to the legislation that I’m currently learning about in my ‘Understanding Autism’ course, I am very grateful I had my mum present during this meeting to act as an advocate, to aid my understanding and decipher the ‘hidden meanings’ and sarcasm that this conversation was sadly full of. After this interaction I have since learnt that:

The Autism Act 2009: “informs local authorities, what actions should be taken to meet the needs of individuals with autism living in their area.” It states that local authorities:

“should provide autism awareness training for all staff.” 

(Source: NCFE Certificate in Understanding Autism Workbook 1.)

If the warden had this awareness training then they would have known:

  • Not to fill 60% of time out of the hour with jokes.
  • Not to criticize the length of complaint given.
  • Not to state what is happening in the cases of people outside the immediate environment.
  • Not to use anxiety as an excuse for experiencing problems with the housing situation.
  • To listen and be respectful and be careful not to put extra stress onto the person via ‘hidden meanings’ in the conversation, to use clear and concise questioning.
  • Not to use sarcasm in the conversation, as it can make the person feel belittled and will shut down.
  • That people with ASD are often affected by loud noises, such as people shouting and confrontations.

 

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People with mental health difficulties, and disabilities, such as ASD/ASC experience this sort of lack of awareness and understanding everyday. I want to do my best to combat this so that other people don’t have to experience the same as what I have.

And I still don’t know what is happening with the housing situation, we have a view to move, even though we are not the ones causing all of the issues, but I will do everything in my power to keep my children safe, there is also the issue that Lou is finding sharing a bedroom with her younger sister difficult and should really have her own specified space to allow her to calm in her own environment and Moo should have her own room as her ‘safe zone,’ where she can retreat to if Lou is having a ‘sensory overload.’ The uncertainty is unnerving, but watch this space.

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